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Clinical Trials

St Chad’s Surgery Research Department

St Chad’s has been active in Phase II to IV clinical trials for more than 15 years. It has a fully equipped research office and is accredited as a Research Ready practice by the Royal College of General Practitioners.

It currently employs 2 qualified Nurses as Research Nurse/Coordinators, Eunice Williams and Julie Burton, who are managed by the Principal Investigator, Dr Nick Jones.  Eunice and Julie have extensive research skills and experience.  Dr Jones has been acknowledged as a leading Commercial Principal Investigator by the national Institute for Health Research. The entire research team receives regular training updates; in particular, specialist training in Good Clinical Practice.

In addition to commercial clinical trials which are funded by pharmaceutical companies, the Research Department facilitates NHS-led research within the surgery to help improve patient care nationally.

St Chad’s also collaborates with 7 local practices in the locality under the banner of “Baronet”, (Bath Area Research Network), www.baronet.org.uk   .   Eunice Williams is responsible for updating the Standard Operating Procedures for the entire Baronet network.

Can You Help?

Research cannot function without the support of eligible volunteers. The drugs we commonly prescribe today would not be available if they had not been subject to extensive clinical trials in the past.

We are currently working with patients in a variety of therapeutic areas ranging from diabetes, heart failure to depression.

We are now actively recruiting for study in type 2 diabetes, heart failure and depression.  We are always looking for volunteers to participate in studies and welcome any enquiries.

For further information, please contact the Research Team directly on 01761 409885 or via the main surgery reception.  The notice board in the main waiting room also holds information on some of these studies.



 
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